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Tuesday, June 4
 

7:00am EDT

8:00am EDT

Pre-conference - Text Mining 101
Supporting text mining research requires an understanding of the process of text mining in order for librarians to assist researchers to use library resources as sources text mining data, to license electronic resources in way that makes provisions for such uses, and to manage and/or provide access to text mining tools among other activities. Because text mining is a relatively new method for research, few librarians have had an introduction to and/or training needed to accomplish these tasks. In this pre-conference workshop I will introduce participants to the basics of text-mining including defining terms, identifying library resources that may serve as data sources for text mining, and introducing the tools and processes used for text mining, for instance the Hathi Trust’s Text Analysis Algorithms and Python scripting.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Sarah Sutton

Dr. Sarah Sutton

Associate Professor of Library and Information Man, Emporia State University School of Library and Information Management
I'm currently on the faculty of the School of Library and Information Management at Emporia State University where I teach information organization, collection development, and, of course, e-resources management. I love to talk about what practicing librarians in serials and e-resources... Read More →


Tuesday June 4, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm EDT
Conference Center A - CL Floor

9:00am EDT

Board Meeting
Tuesday June 4, 2019 9:00am - 5:00pm EDT
Allegheny - 17th Floor

1:00pm EDT

Pre-conference - Library Leadership Your Way
This pre-conference is intended to be a practical guide for anyone interested in library leadership. Attendees will learn about leadership, become better leaders, and develop their own leadership practices. This pre-conference will allow attendees to engage with the subject of leadership in a meaningful way, by thinking and reflecting on various ideas of leadership and how they might use those ideas in their leadership lives. The point of this pre-conference is not to explain how to lead, but for attendees to discover why they want to lead, how they can best lead, and what their unique leadership practice looks like. Attendees will be asked to think about what leadership means to them, learn overall principles of how to effectively lead themselves and others, be exposed to major leadership theories and philosophies, and finally to revisit their initial ideas about leadership. By the end of the pre-conference, attendees will have developed their own definition of and approach to leadership, understand the basics of major leadership theories and philosophies, and have a leadership practice and plan in place they can use in their everyday leadership lives. This pre-conference is intended for library leaders at all levels – from department head to dean/director, for librarians interested in becoming library leaders, and for informal library leaders as well.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Martin

Jason Martin

Associate Dean, Middle Tennessee State University James E. Walker Library
I am currently the Interim Dean of the Walker Library at Middle Tennessee State University. I research, write, present, and publish on leadership and organizational culture. I also publish and present on mindfulness, emotional intelligence, productivity, and goal setting and achi... Read More →


Tuesday June 4, 2019 1:00pm - 5:00pm EDT
Conference Center B - CL Floor
 
Wednesday, June 5
 

7:00am EDT

8:00am EDT

Pre-conference - BIBFRAME Basics: A Crash Course
Interested in learning about BIBFRAME and how it works? This workshop will go over the basics of what BIBFRAME is, how it was developed, and ongoing BIBFRAME initiatives; then cover the underlying technologies in just enough detail to really understand how BIBFRAME works differently from what we do today, including graph data structures, ontologies, and RDF. Finally, we’ll look at the Library of Congress developed BIBFRAME editor and get some hands-on practice creating and editing a variety of resources. Attendees should plan on bringing a laptop to get the most of their experience.
 


Speakers
avatar for Dennis Christman

Dennis Christman

Metadata Transformation Librarian, Duke University


Wednesday June 5, 2019 8:00am - 12:00pm EDT
Conference Center A - CL Floor

8:00am EDT

Pre-conference - Contract Construction: Creating an Effective Licensing Toolkit in an Academic Library Setting
This session will offer a blueprint for crafting a clear picture of licensing priorities for your library and home institution and for developing an orderly negotiation process to ensure each agreement is properly reviewed and handled. Beginning with a brief overview of standard licensing terms for e-resources, we will discuss how to draw up your own checklists and draft legal provisions customized to successfully fulfill the information needs of your library’s users, while adhering to your institution’s local legal requirements. We will also identify practical methods for reviewing contracts to identify the issues in clauses that are most often challenging or problematic.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Hess

Stephanie Hess

Electronic Resources Librarian, Binghamton University (SUNY)
Stephanie P. Hess has worked in a variety of Technical Services positions since 1998. She is currently the Electronic Resources Librarian at Binghamton University (SUNY) and possesses an extensive background in acquisitions, cataloging, collection development, and serials managem... Read More →
avatar for Megan Kilb

Megan Kilb

E-Resources Librarian, UNC-Chapel Hill


Wednesday June 5, 2019 8:00am - 12:00pm EDT
Conference Center B - CL Floor

1:00pm EDT

User/Discussion Group Meeting - Now Streaming: Mediated vs. Unmediated and Other Dilemmas
Many libraries using popular PDA programs for streaming video experienced a significant surge in popularity and spending in the past year and are looking into various alternatives, including mediated purchasing and the increase in workload that accompanies it. This group will provide an opportunity for an in-person conversation allowing us to share best practices, alternative options, and other discussion related to streaming video.

Speakers
HC

Heather Crozier

Electronic Resources Librarian, Ohio Northern University



Wednesday June 5, 2019 1:00pm - 3:00pm EDT
Conference Center C - CL Floor

1:00pm EDT

User/Discussion Group Meeting - OpenAthens and Issues in Authentication and Access
 In addition to the discussion topic of OpenAthens,  this group might also discuss issues about authentication and access in general, which might be provider neutral, and include procedures for offering access to walkin users, user experience, usage data collection, privacy, dual factor authentication, working with campus IT, etc.  So even if a library doesn't use OpenAthens, but uses EZProxy or a different system, they might also contribute to and benefit from this conversation.  
 


Speakers
avatar for Donna Bennett

Donna Bennett

Associate Director, Collection & Resource Services, Georgia College and State University


Wednesday June 5, 2019 1:00pm - 3:00pm EDT
Carnegie III- CL Floor

1:00pm EDT

User/Discussion Group Meeting - Systems & Interlibrary Loan Librarian Discussion
Topic:  Student success and the Intersection of Interlibrary Loan/Resource Sharing, Electronic Resources and Discovery Tools.

1. How Interlibrary Loan/Resource Sharing and Discovery works to provide access to materials
2. Collaboration -- university community awareness of library services for additional research needs
3. Positive or negative experiences with these services

Speakers
JM

Jean M. Charlot

Systems & Resource Sharing Librarian, Delaware State University


Wednesday June 5, 2019 1:00pm - 3:00pm EDT
Oliver - CL-Floor

1:00pm EDT

User/Discussion Group Meeting -A collaborative approach to driving user awareness
How do your faculty and students learn about the resources that are available to them and what scholarly content they have access to? During this session we’ll share the results of a recent survey focusing on the challenges around driving user awareness. And we’ll have an open discussion around how to effectively promote your digital resources. Come prepared to explore ways that librarians and publishers can collaborate on the common challenge of driving awareness.

Speakers
avatar for Sara Rotjan

Sara Rotjan

Assistant Marketing Director, AIP Publishing


Wednesday June 5, 2019 1:00pm - 3:00pm EDT
Vandergrift - CL-Floor

1:00pm EDT

Pre-conference - The Future of Scholarly Communications
Structured as an interactive workshop, this pre-conference will explore possible futures of scholarly communications and publishing and implications for access, collections, and preservation. Drawing on trends analysis and potential scenarios that have been developed by publishers, library associations, etc., participants will explore what may be possible, plausible, feasible, and/or desirable as well as what seems impossible about these futures. Though no conclusions will be reached about “the future” of scholarly communications, this exploration of “the futures” of scholarly communications will enable participants to think critically and creatively about their organizations, the impact of change and trends, and strategic positioning going forward.
 


Speakers
avatar for Lisa Hinchliffe

Lisa Hinchliffe

Professor/ Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction, University of Illinois, Urbana
Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe is Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is also an affiliate faculty member in the University’s School of Information Sciences. Lisa has presented... Read More →


Wednesday June 5, 2019 1:00pm - 5:00pm EDT
Conference Center A - CL Floor

4:00pm EDT

5:30pm EDT

Opening Session
Wednesday June 5, 2019 5:30pm - 6:30pm EDT
Grand Ballroom - 17th Floor

6:30pm EDT

Opening Reception
Wednesday June 5, 2019 6:30pm - 9:30pm EDT
Urban - 17th Floor
 
Thursday, June 6
 

7:00am EDT

Breakfast Buffet
Thursday June 6, 2019 7:00am - 8:45am EDT
Hallway outside of Grand Ballroom

7:00am EDT

7:30am EDT

Speaker's Breakfast

Thursday June 6, 2019 7:30am - 8:45am EDT
Monongahela - 17th Floor

9:00am EDT

Vision Session I - Courageous Leadership: Walking Your Talk from Wherever You Are
We are experiencing significant shifts in leadership, at national and local levels, and within and across our professional communities. As the opinions swing about style and characteristics of leaders, there are some constants. We need leaders at every level of our organizations, including people who do not see themselves in these roles. Leaders must be culturally competent, able to engage and create space for new voices. And leaders must be brave. You are often standing, taking action in the service of a greater good. This session is for leaders, all of us, who are taking courageous action in the service of shared values. It will inspire you to act, remind you about your why, and provide practical steps for leading from wherever you are.  

Join Zoom Meeting
https://encore-us.zoom.us/j/519982210


Bio - DeEtta Jones
For over 20 years, DeEtta Jones has guided people and organizations through the process of fundamental transformation. She has been a leading voice in shaping contemporary thinking and practice around integrated and sustainable approaches to personal transformation, workplace culture, diversity and inclusion.

Before launching DeEtta Jones and Associates in 2005, she served for 10 years as Director of Diversity and then Director of the Office of Leadership and Management Services at the Association of Research Libraries, an international not-for-profit representing the largest research institutions in North America. In these roles, DeEtta was called upon as a thought-leader to set direction for the design and oversight of more than 9 international leadership programs, as well as a suite of professional development services including training and organization development. Prior to this, she was Director of Multicultural Education at Colorado State University and Director of Human Rights Advocacy and Education for the City of Fort Collins.

DeEtta has served as an adjunct faculty member, teaching undergraduate and graduate courses on leadership and diversity, at Colorado State University and University of Maryland, College Park. DeEtta has a bachelor’s degree in psychology, a master’s degree in student affairs in higher education from Colorado State University, and an MBA from The Johns Hopkins University. She lives outside of Chicago, IL, with her husband and their children.


Speakers

Thursday June 6, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
Grand Ballroom - 17th Floor

10:15am EDT

Break
Thursday June 6, 2019 10:15am - 10:45am EDT

10:45am EDT

Demystifying Digital Preservation: Recommendations for Organizations, Libraries, and Information Professionals
The NASIG Digital Preservation Task Force was charged to, “...identify new roles for librarians and publishers as well as the impact of these changes on preservation in an ever-changing digital environment, and develop some best practices for the industry. The task force will identify ways in which NASIG can be involved in proactive digital preservation, including tools for marketing digital preservation to a broad range of library administrations and publishers.” To that end, the committee created a survey to help inform how NASIG could best direct its efforts in raising awareness and supporting digital preservation initiatives today. In this presentation, the committee will share the survey findings and highlight the breadth of the task force’s work in the context of current best practices in digital preservation, and recent developments in the field. In addition, this presentation will outline the task force’s resulting recommendations for NASIG’s role in supporting digital preservation, and how the information community can move forward implementing and supporting digital preservation initiatives.

Speakers
avatar for Shannon Keller

Shannon Keller

Helen Bernstein Librarian for Periodicals and Journals, New York Public Library



Thursday June 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:45am EDT
Lawrence Welk Room - Mezzanine

10:45am EDT

EBA is not for you, or is it?
In an effort to make better use of their collection money many libraries have looked at different new ways to acquire their e-books. Traditional models like firm and approval ordering are no longer sufficient and beneficial for libraries. Libraries have been adding new non-traditional e-book acquisition models over the last few decades. In the late nineties, Patron-Driven Acquisition (PDA) or Demand-Driven Acquisition (DDA) models were developed by many e-book providers and adopted by libraries around the world.

Then came, six to seven years ago, the Evidence-Based Acquisition (EBA) also referred as Evidence-Based Selection (EBS) model, available from many publishers. Libraries saw in this new model a system where it would allow them for more mediation in title selection and in the control of their spending than what PDA/DDA was able to offer. It is believed that EBA models are more cost-effective and beneficial than purchasing large e-book packages. Is it really true? The EBA studies so far have shown data analysis within a short time frame and usually with only one publisher.


This article reports on a comparison of e-book purchases between the Big Deal and EBA models over a five-year period between 2014 and 2018.  This study is looking at the purchases of large e-book packages from three major commercial publishers: Elsevier, Springer and Wiley. These Big Deal acquisitions are then analyzed from these publishers’ respective EBA models to find out which scenario is the most beneficial and cost-effective for our library. The study is looking not only at the data in terms of costs (total, per collection and per title) but also usage of collections and titles over time. Has the Library made the best decision in purchasing large e-book packages? Would it had been better to go with EBA models?

These are some of the questions that this study will answer.

Speakers
avatar for Louis Houle

Louis Houle

Director Collections, McGill University



Thursday June 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:45am EDT
Allegheny - 17th Floor

10:45am EDT

Open Educational Resources, OERs, buliding collaborative bridges
The topic of providing Open Educational Resources, OERs, as an alternative to costly textbooks for students in higher education is on the minds of educators, administrators, librarians, publishers, and faculty these days. All are eager to ease the cost burden of higher education by providing students with freely available, openly licensed learning materials, but each constituency faces specific barriers and has specific questions to be resolved.

At Emporia State University, faculty, librarians, and administrators are at the beginning of an exploration of the advantages and disadvantages that are part and parcel of creating, adopting, storing, maintaining, and licensing OERs. A task force has been formed to "establish a baseline for current OER efforts at ESU and to initiate a process of discovery to evaluate resources and infrastructure necessary to enlarge our OER efforts beyond the current baseline" (OER Task Force charge). Some of the topics that the Task Force may consider are

* Weighing the strengths and weaknesses of including OER as a strategic plan initiative;
* Analyzing faculty work conditions within an OER environment;
* Determining the need to adjust institutional intellectual property rights policies;
* Assessing student attitudes toward OER as well as preferences for digital or print resources;
* Exploring faculty incentives for assessing/adapting/authoring OER;
* Assessing the financial impact of OER to the bookstore and the Memorial Union;
* Developing an information campaign to educate faculty, students, and staff about OER;
* Exploring software systems, like Intellus, that might facilitate OER access;
* Cataloging ready-made resources, like Open Stax, for faculty availability.

One thing that is clear is that the collaborations among ESU constituencies, among institutions of higher education in Kansas and the Midwest, and among educators, administrators, librarians, publishers, and faculty are necessary to the success of an OER project at ESU. In this presentation, I propose to present the experiences of the OER task force, particularly their collaborations with both internal and external stakeholders, as well as the results of their work as a case study. I will focus on sharing how collaborations with stakeholders influenced the process, the choices, and the outcomes of the work of the task force; particularly those that are transferable and may have benefits for other institutions of higher education.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Sarah Sutton

Dr. Sarah Sutton

Associate Professor of Library and Information Man, Emporia State University School of Library and Information Management
I'm currently on the faculty of the School of Library and Information Management at Emporia State University where I teach information organization, collection development, and, of course, e-resources management. I love to talk about what practicing librarians in serials and e-resources... Read More →



Thursday June 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:45am EDT
Grand Ballroom - 17th Floor

10:45am EDT

Optimizing Discovery: Developing a Holistic Approach to Managing a Discovery Service
The discovery service has become a prominent and valuable tool within many of today's libraries. Created to meet user expectations in the age of Google, these services aim to provide a single search platform for an institution's digital collections. Ideally, they seamlessly connect users to resources spread across various publisher sites and databases. However, without proper configuration and regular assessment, these services can may have frustrating barriers that potentially drive users away. This presentation will outline a holistic approach for identifying such barriers and optimizing a discovery service, focusing on system knowledge, user experience, and strong communication.

The approach described will be applicable to most institutions and discovery systems, but will draw examples from a recent project to help illustrate the ideas. In 2012, Ohio University Libraries adopted EBSCO Discovery Service, but by 2017 the public interface and back-end functionality remained little changed. Anecdotal evidence suggested it was poorly viewed by both users and library staff. Improving the service was prioritized in late 2017, when a working group was formed to assess and improve it. The E-Resources Librarian maintained responsibility for managing the system, but working group meetings proved valuable in connecting technical management to public experience.

The presentation will discuss three key elements for optimizing a discovery service. The first element is understanding the functionality of your discovery system to actively manage it. Doing so may require seeking documentation, educational sessions, and presenting questions to vendor representatives and colleagues. The goal is to reduce reliance on support representatives for routine maintenance and troubleshooting. These representatives are valuable contacts, but are not fully aware of an institution's unique needs and configuration (e.g. regional access, proxy servers, subscription details). Understanding the ins and outs of a system will allow timelier troubleshooting and hands-on customization.

The second element is better understanding users through feedback and interaction. Usage statistics are crucial for managing e-resources, but qualitative feedback can provide further insight into common search strategies and the general opinion of a service. This presentation will reflect on recent usability testing at OU Libraries, conducted to better gauge user experience. Though more difficult and time consuming than gathering statistics, the feedback proved crucial to developing improvements in linking and the visual layout.

The final element is communicating and collaborating with colleagues. Discovery service management often rests with technical services librarians who may have little direct contact with the average user. Reference staff and instructional librarians may serve as advocates for users while also playing a major role in promoting the value of a discovery service to users. The latter requires buy-in from the staff, which can be fostered through routine and transparent communication when updating the service and addressing issues. OU Libraries has seen the value of this approach firsthand through the formation of the aforementioned working group, in which four of the six members work in public services. The group also held open staff forums on the discovery service and actively sought feedback on proposed changes.

Speakers
avatar for Seth Sisler

Seth Sisler

Electronic Resources Librarian, Ohio University



Thursday June 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:45am EDT
Three Rivers - WP Floor

10:45am EDT

Out with the old, in with the new: revising ERM workflows in a time of change
Electronic Resources and Metadata (ERM) work can be time sensitive and constantly changing. It is difficult to keep track of tasks, projects, and what staff are working on. Communication, leadership, flexibility, and clear workflows are essential to successfully track and manage ERM tasks. However, workflows can easily become outdated, causing inefficiency and roadblocks.

In December 2019, the University of Guelph Library will be migrating to a Library Services Platform as part of OCUL Collaborative Futures project. This migration, combined with staffing changes and outdated workflows, inspired the Electronic Resources & Metadata team to begin revising many of their workflows, focusing on prioritization, clean-up, and streamlining. This session describes their workflow revision process, including local context, change management strategies for this process, and guiding principles for the revision. Emphasis will be placed on the NASIG Core Competencies for Electronic Resources Librarians, including communication, leadership, and flexibility, and their impact on workflows.

Speakers
avatar for Kailey Brisbin

Kailey Brisbin

Electronic Resources & Metadata Librarian, University of Guelph
HS

Hana Storova

E-resources & Metadata Librarian, University of Guelph



Thursday June 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:45am EDT
Monongahela - 17th Floor

11:45am EDT

Lunch
Thursday June 6, 2019 11:45am - 1:15pm EDT
Urban - 17th Floor

11:45am EDT

1:15pm EDT

Ebooks: Access vs Ownership
Over the past several years, the trend in libraries has been a preference for ownership over subscription when it comes to ebooks acquisitions. Vendors and aggregators offer many different models to help streamline and simplify acquiring ebook including frontfile purchases from the vendor, as well as DDA/PDA and a variety of evidence-based plans. With each purchase model, though, come different technical services workflows required to manage not only the plans, but the purchases, in addition to cataloging and maintaining the holdings. There is also the unknown costs per year, though deposit accounts make it easier to budget and manage the cost.
Subscription resources, however, provide one workflow as well as a known cost component. In addition to this, the maintenance of the collection, including additions, deletions and weeding out-of-date resources, is basically done by the vendor.
In this session, two librarians will discuss pros and cons of both options (including acquisitions, cataloging and maintenance) and present the argument that for small technical services departments, perhaps subscription is a better model than ownership, when available.

Speakers
avatar for Alexis Linoski

Alexis Linoski

Collection Strategy Librarian, Georgia Institute of Technology Library
I manage collection strategy, including acquisitions and eresource management, with an emphasis on electronic resources, such as eJournals, eBooks, database resources, and streaming media. She is particularly interested in how the library’s collection strategies can support the... Read More →
avatar for Sofia Slutskaya

Sofia Slutskaya

Head, Resource Description, Emory University Libraries


Thursday June 6, 2019 1:15pm - 2:15pm EDT
Allegheny - 17th Floor

1:15pm EDT

Inside-Out and Outside-In: A Holistic Approach to Metadata Assessment for an Off-Site Storage Collection
With demands on library space increasing, while research collections continue to grow, off-site storage is becoming a reality for academic research libraries across North America. In 2005, the University of Toronto Libraries (UTL) established a high-density storage and preservation facility to preserve and maintain print serials and low use monographic resources. Aptly named Keep@Downsview, this collection now contains over 3 million volumes and has evolved into a collaborative partnership with four other Ontario universities. As our off-site collections continue to expand, this presents unique challenges for UTL in facilitating resource discovery and access. Since library users cannot physically browse the Keep@Downsview collections, the only way to discover these resources is through the metadata contained in the library’s discovery systems. To ensure that these resources remain accessible to the scholarly community, it is crucial that the metadata for these collections is optimized for search and discovery. With the goal of improving access to our off-site collections, we conducted an investigation into the state of our metadata for the print serial collection held at the Keep@Downsview facility. In this assessment, we analyzed metadata elements based on the following metrics: completeness, accuracy, consistency and coherence, conformance to expectations, timeliness and accessibility. Additionally, we conducted a qualitative investigation into how our metadata is perceived through the eyes of researchers, librarians, and our Keep@Downsview partners. By approaching metadata assessment from both an ‘Inside-Out’ and ‘Outside-In’ perspective, our aim was to obtain a holistic view of the quality and effectiveness of our metadata and explore strategies for improving the discovery of our remotely held collections.

Speakers
avatar for Marlene van Ballegooie

Marlene van Ballegooie

Metadata Technologies Manager, University of Toronto
Marlene van Ballegooie is the Metadata Technologies Manager at the University of Toronto Libraries. She received her MISt degree from the Faculty of Information Studies, University of Toronto. At the University of Toronto Libraries, Marlene is responsible for managing the Metadata... Read More →
avatar for Juliya Borie

Juliya Borie

Metadata Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries
Juliya Borie is a Metadata Librarian at the University of Toronto Libraries. She is responsible for managing resources description for serials and monographic materials in a variety of languages and formats. Starting this year, she will be serving on the NASIG Mentoring and Student... Read More →


Thursday June 6, 2019 1:15pm - 2:15pm EDT
Lawrence Welk Room - Mezzanine

1:15pm EDT

Mentorship in Collections & Resource Management: An Implied Competency
While mentorship is not explicitly mentioned in NASIG’s core competencies, it has an implied role in relationship building and perpetual learning, which are essential to the profession. In our rapidly changing information industries, many of our roles and responsibilities revolve around skills we were not formally taught. Even expertly crafted and forward thinking MLIS curricula cannot anticipate all the unexpected developments and challenges that impact our work in collections management, assessment, systems, and discovery. Robust and dynamic mentorship opportunities help formalize reciprocal knowledge sharing and support adaptive skill development.

Peer-to-peer learning can be incredibly valuable, but those who are new to the profession, or are entering unfamiliar professional territory (like e-resource management), might not have an obvious peer group to rely on. Mentorship can help new or transitioning professionals, while simultaneously exposing those who are more established in the field to the perspectives of practitioners at different career stages. Mutually beneficial mentorship plays a vital role in keeping the profession agile and enhancing its inclusivity.

This session will focus on the purpose and benefits of mentorship, while summarizing the presenters’ experiences. Courtney McAllister will comment on the mentee’s perspective, reflecting on the formal and informal mentorship opportunities she has pursued. Kirstin Steele will describe the mentor’s perspective and share her experiences supporting the professional development and growth of paraprofessionals, librarians, MLIS students, and others.

Attendees can expect to learn more about useful mentee/mentorship practices and expectations, professional areas that benefit from mentorship, and how to expand mentorship beyond the librarian-librarian dynamic. The interrelationship between the Personal Strengths outlined in NASIG's competencies and the qualities of a successful mentor/mentee will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Courtney McAllister

Courtney McAllister

Electronic Resources Librarian, Yale Law Library
avatar for Kirstin Steele

Kirstin Steele

Branch Librarian, Berkeley County Library System



Thursday June 6, 2019 1:15pm - 2:15pm EDT
Three Rivers - WP Floor

1:15pm EDT

Minding Your Ps and Qs: Predatory Journals, Piracy, and Quality Questions

Once upon a time, serials librarians could point to a clear delineation between quality journals and those that didn’t measure up. The rise of predatory journals and the dubious methods they use to attract researchers to publish in them is creating disruption in the scholarly publishing landscape. One result is a blurring of the lines between what should be in library collections and what shouldn’t. Additionally, less experienced scholars are confused about where to publish and even distinguished academics can unknowingly agree to be on editorial boards or even become editors of problematic journals.

Two views of this challenging landscape will be presented. The first presentation, from a former academic/corporate librarian and currently editor of a magazine for librarians, outlines dangers such as pirated versions of scholarly articles and concerns that inappropriate, incorrect, and incoherent “sting” articles being accepted in open access journals have soured the general public on the expertise of scientists. In a “fake news” world, debasing scholarly research is a potent threat to academic disciplines and to libraries. Ideas on how to identify publishers who might be predatory and guard against researchers publishing in their journals will be provided, given the demise of Beall’s list and the huge growth in the subscription lists published by Cabells. Practical tips for librarians dealing with piracy and predatory publishing will focus on the need for quality, the marketing of library services in support of scholarly communication, and connecting with our varied communities that are affected by a diminution of authority of valid scholarly research.

The second presentation, from the head of the U.S ISSN Center, recounts the experiences of ISSN staff on the front lines of dealing with the full range of new publishers and explores the broader questions raised by the predatory publishing phenomenon. Libraries, academia, traditional publishers, and others need to continue grappling with their roles and responsibilities regarding this new reality. Are all start-up open access journals predatory? Are blacklists or whitelists the answer given the controversy and about Beall’s List and the potential for bias in any blacklist? What part does the open-access trend play? Are cosmetic flaws such as poor English in front matter always indicative of low quality articles? Can good research be found in non-mainstream journals? Even more fundamentally, what are the market forces and online environment characteristics that have given rise to this situation? What role and responsibility do the large subscription publishers have? Is predatory publishing an unanticipated consequence of the high cost of traditional journals? What is the information community now doing and what can it change in order to at least mitigate the worst aspects of the new publishing landscape.

Speakers
avatar for Marydee Ojala

Marydee Ojala

Editor-in-Chief, Online Searcher
Marydee Ojala is the Editor-in-Chief of Online Searcher magazine (www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher) and Editor of ILI 365 eNews (www.infotoday.eu). A frequent speaker at library and technology conferences worldwide, she also serves as program director for a number of conferences... Read More →
avatar for Regina Reynolds

Regina Reynolds

Director, U.S. ISSN Center; Head, ISSN Section, Library of Congress
Regina Romano Reynolds is director of the U.S. ISSN Center and head of the ISSN Section at the Library of Congress. She was a member of the U.S. RDA Test Coordinating Committee and co-chaired the internal LC group that recommended LC projects based on the report of the Working Group... Read More →



Thursday June 6, 2019 1:15pm - 2:15pm EDT
Monongahela - 17th Floor

1:15pm EDT

Predicting Potential Electronic Serials Use
When assessing the value of electronic serials, librarians are typically limited to looking at the usage of serials to which their library already subscribes. While this is useful for making renewal decisions, librarians are often flying blind when considering new subscriptions. Librarians often look at interlibrary loan requests to gauge interest in unsubscribed materials, but we know that these requests don’t tell the full story. Without other available data, it is difficult for librarians to make informed decisions about what subscriptions to add.

This presentation will look beyond interlibrary loan data to discuss other methods for predicting future use, including usage numbers of similar materials, turnaway statistics, and data from failed link resolver requests. Each of these methods has strengths and weaknesses, and each can all tell librarians something different about how users are discovering and attempting to access materials.

I will discuss some of the recent literature that discusses the association of the data from these sources with usage numbers. I will also share preliminary data from my institution, attempting to correlate prior year indicators of interest in electronic serials with first year use of new acquisitions.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew J. Jabaily

Matthew J. Jabaily

Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian, Kraemer Family Library, University of Colorado Colorado Springs



Thursday June 6, 2019 1:15pm - 2:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom - 17th Floor

2:30pm EDT

Building Bridges for Social Justice in Global Publishing: Seeking the Mexican Perspective
In May 2018, the presenter was funded by a NASIG international travel grant to interview journal editors and librarians at universities in Puebla Mexico that included: La Universidad de las Américas Puebla (UDLAP), Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (BUAP), and Universidad Iberoamericana, Puebla. The interviews and discussions explored challenges for Mexican researchers to publish in major English-language journals of the US, UK and Europe, the current levels of open access involvement at their institutions, future outlook for open access in Mexico, and social justice implications of the current global academic journal publishing and scholarly communication ecosystems dominated by the English-speaking, Global North.

Academic journal publishing is currently dominated to a great extent by English-language, commercial publishers based in the US, UK, and Europe (or the area of political-economic dominance often referred to as the Global North). In order for institutions of the Global South to compete in the global knowledge economy, their universities must compete in global university ranking systems of which publication is a part. In turn, many of their researchers must compete with researchers of the Global North to publish in “reputable” and “prestigious” journals of the Global North for local career standing and global competitiveness. To support those competitive publishing expectations, institutions of the Global South subscribe to the costly, English-language journal packages of the Global North, thus locking in a cycle of academic publishing hegemony. While Mexico and the rest of Latin America struggle to compete in this knowledge economy, they are making inroads into viable open access publications, OA archiving, and networking projects that are increasingly better recognized and integrated into international finding tools such as Web of Science and DOAJ.

Thus, NASIG member are called to engage issues of social justice in our global scholarly communication system. We are asked to reconsider a system that disadvantages researchers of the Global South whose native-language, regional publications can contribute greatly to world knowledge but are often regarded less favorably or even excluded from the global discourse of their discipline. Audience members will be encouraged to discuss these issues and how, through grass-roots engagement and listening to researchers from areas such as Mexico, we can move toward a more globally equitable scholarly communication system that is not dominated by powers and preferences of the Global North.

Speakers
AS

Allan Scherlen

Appalachian State University


Thursday June 6, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm EDT
Grand Ballroom - 17th Floor

2:30pm EDT

Connecting the dots: Reader ratings, bibliographic data, and machine-learning algorithms for monograph selection
Traditional collection development relies heavily on human input, with librarians relying on reviews and subject selection lists, and through user requests. With the development of machine learning, more and more businesses seek automated methods to deliver results relevant to users. The Recommender system, a subclass of information filtering that seeks to predict the "rating" or "preference" of a user, is among the most successful systems of machine learning in action. It has been adopted by many major e-commerce businesses such as Amazon, Netflix, and Expedia, and has been widely implemented to predict product and media recommendations, making it a key factor in increasing product average order value and the number of items per order.

Drawing inspiration from the benefits of a recommender system to business and its success in heightening the reliability of recommendations, we attempted to build optimal collection recommendations with machine-learning algorithms using Python. The purpose of this project is to help librarians make collection decisions using the recommender system, and in this presentation we will illustrate several examples of building this system to aid in the selection of monographs. One example involves the merging of popular titles with reader rating data. We found that while The New York Times publishes best seller titles based on the rates of sales, they do not have any connection to user ratings. By leveraging data from Goodreads, the world’s largest site for readers and book recommendations, we will build a simple recommender system that produces The New York Times best seller titles that have higher user rating using a matrix factorization based method.

Another example of using a recommender system is to have the ability to refer selectors to books that are similar to a particular title based on pairwise similarity scores. News services are already able to identify related articles of interest to readers based on the articles that they have read in the past, so applying this system to libraries is an exciting prospect. Drawing on bibliographic data from highly circulated items, the recommender system will suggest items with similar features using similarity metrics. The recommender system will use machine-learning algorithms not only to simplify collection development for librarians, but will also help end users discover more items relevant to their interests.

Speakers
avatar for Jingshan Xiao

Jingshan Xiao

Associate Director for Technology and Resource Man, University of Houston Clear Lake
avatar for Wenli Gao

Wenli Gao

Data librarian, University of Houston



Thursday June 6, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm EDT
Lawrence Welk Room - Mezzanine

2:30pm EDT

Interactions between technical and public services: Perceptions from three different librarians
Like many technical service staff, ERL’s work involves a significant portion of behind-the-scenes work: acquiring and describing electronic resources and maintaining access to setting up electronic resources. Their work is often invisible to the public and under-valued by the administration. Because of the lack of interaction with users, they may not address the real needs of the community. On the contrary, public service librarians are the front-line service providers, so they know the needs of their users and they can make a more direct and visible impact on the community. This session will feature three librarians who have responsibilities and experiences in technical and public services work. One presenter will share how an electronic resources librarian applies the outward facing method to their ebook related work. They will discuss how this has impacted their relationship with the public service librarians, and as a result, making their work more purposeful and vital. Another presentation will explore an electronic resources management librarian’s new role as a liaison librarian. The presenter will share what skills they brought to the new position that have been an asset, as well as what skills they have had to develop. They will also share what librarians in both resource management roles and education roles should understand about each other in order to help build relationships between library units and ultimately improve the ecosystem for resource acquisition, management, outreach, and use. A third presentation will cover how technical services work is coordinated by a solo librarian in a startup school. From managing e-resources for K-12 education research to developing collections policy and a library website from scratch, the presenter will discuss how to communicate with various non-library stakeholders on issues relating to the importance of scholarly communications, OER, collection assessment and the library's overall impact on academic curriculum development and student success.

Speakers
avatar for Raymond Pun

Raymond Pun

Librarian, Hoover Institution Library & Archives
he/him. School/Academic librarian. NISO Diversity Scholarship Recipient 2020. 
avatar for Xiaoyan Song

Xiaoyan Song

Electronic Resources Librarian, NC State University Libraries
Xiaoyan Song is the Electronic Resource Librarian (ERL) at the Monograph Unit in the Acquisition and Discovery (A&D) department at NCSU Libraries. She mingles with all aspects of ebooks including acquisition, license negotiation, activation, ebook troubleshooting, and workflow mapping... Read More →
avatar for Heidi Zuniga

Heidi Zuniga

Librarian, Colorado State University


Thursday June 6, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm EDT
Monongahela - 17th Floor

2:30pm EDT

Prioritizing Accessibility in the E-Resources Procurement Lifecycle: VPATs as a Practical Tool for E-Resource Acquisitions and Remediation Workflow, at Two Academic Libraries
Academic libraries are ethically and legally responsible to follow federal disability law. Specifically, Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 requires electronic and information technology to be fully accessible to individuals with disabilities. It is also become readily understood that a resource born digitally is not necessarily accessible to individuals with disabilities. Hence, Voluntary Product Accessibility Templates (VPATs), provided by vendors based on their compliance to the recently revised Section 508, are being used by libraries. However, they can be difficult to understand and not always reliable so essentially verification or user testing is still recommended. There have also been two major revisions in 2018 leading from VPAT® 1.0 to 2.0.  The purpose of this presentation is to document how two major public universities libraries are approaching VPATs in in a workable and time effective manner during e-resources acquisitions and remediation workflows.

Wichita State University Libraries is using VPATs to efficiently verify the accuracy of vendor claims and assess the usability of digital content by users with disabilities through the use of an Accessibility Remediation Guide. The guide is used to efficiently review library licensed content for accessibility and identify areas of concern, which are reported to the vendor for remediation. VPATs and other accessibility documentation is used by WSU libraries in user communication as well. By highlighting essential standards from the VPAT, WSU libraries has been able to prioritize accessibility in the e-resources workflow. At the College of Staten Island Library, through the assistance of a PSC-CUNY grant and after integrating accessibility into its general policy practices, the library further explored how to utilize VPAT’s in a practical method during its procurement practices. At the same time, CUNY and the CSI campus underwent widespread changes in its IT procurement practices and dissemination of accessibility information amongst the university libraries. The CSI library will discuss how it is using VPAT’s to help determine the appropriate acquisition or non-acquisition decision-making in regards to the procurement lifecycle of e-resources.

Speakers
avatar for Prof Kerry Falloon

Prof Kerry Falloon

Acquisitions Librarian, CUNY- College of Staten Island
With over a decade of experience in academic libraries, my prior positions included Acquisitions & Collection Development librarian at Saint Peter's University, Administrator of Technical Services at Ocean County Community College and currently, Assistant Professor & Acquisitions... Read More →
avatar for Faye O'Reilly

Faye O'Reilly

Digital Resources Librarian, Wichita State University Libraries
Ask me about digital accessibility & underserved patron populations outreach via electronic resources.



Thursday June 6, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm EDT
Allegheny - 17th Floor

2:30pm EDT

Project ReShare: Building a community-owned resource sharing platform
Project ReShare is a community-driven effort to inject new life into the resource sharing space. The project was announced in November 2018 by a group of consortial leaders, software developers, software foundations, and resource sharing experts. ReShare’s goal is to produce an open source, highly scalable resource sharing platform that supports the full lifecycle from discovery to management to fulfillment.

This presentation will introduce ReShare and describe how the project partners are working to improve the resource sharing experience for library end users and staff. Areas of focus will include the creation of a shared index to communicate information about lendable materials across libraries and the design of a user-friendly fulfillment system that will modernize many of the legacy practices surrounding interlibrary loan. We will share outcomes from our design process, including requirements, data models, sketches, and prototypes.

Additionally, we will discuss the ways that ReShare is helping to further the model for community-owned software within the library field. The project represents an evolution of the relationships between librarians and vendors, the impact of library experts on the software design process, and the ability to library stakeholders to influence the tools they use every day. We’ll also address the intersection between ReShare and the FOLIO project, and examine the ways that a modular, open source architecture can benefit not only individual projects, but the library ecosystem as a whole.

Speakers


Thursday June 6, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm EDT
Three Rivers - WP Floor

3:30pm EDT

Break
Thursday June 6, 2019 3:30pm - 3:45pm EDT

3:45pm EDT

Vendor Lightning Talks
Speakers
KM

Ken May

Sales Manager, AIP Publishing
MM

Melissa Mazza

Bloomsbury Digital Resources
avatar for Michael Qiu

Michael Qiu

Senior Global Library Relations Manager, American Chemical Society
ACS Publications: What's New at ACS Publications
avatar for Kristen Twardowski

Kristen Twardowski

Library Sales Manager, U.S. and Canada, Duke University Press
Kristen Twardowski oversees Duke University Press's relationships with libraries and consortia in the US and Canada. She is eager to talk about ebooks, open access, and equity and inclusion.In light of the spread of COVID-19 and in solidarity with those affected, Duke University Press... Read More →
avatar for Xavier Claret

Xavier Claret

Director, DIGITALIA, INC.
DIGITALIA HISPANICA www.digitaliapublishing.com is the leading database in Spanish with more than 40,000 e-books & e-journals from the most recognized publishers from Spain and all the Latin American countries. The titles are organized by collections according to the relevant academic... Read More →
JM

Jenifer Maloney

Oxford University Press
GF

Gregory F. Malar

The Rockefeller University Press
CS

Caitlin Sheeder-Borrelli

Taylor & Francis Group
avatar for Nicole Ameduri

Nicole Ameduri

Licensing Manager, Springer Nature
I've been working in academic publishing for 8 years. I'm a proud member of NASIG as well as the fundraising coordinator. When I'm not working, I spend most of my time in Lake Placid working on the 46 Adirondack High Peaks.
ER

Ebsco Representative

Ebsco Information Services



Thursday June 6, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
Grand Ballroom - 17th Floor

5:00pm EDT

Great Idea Showcase
Posters:
  • Cris Ferguson - Bridging the Gap to the Full Text Using Browser Extensions 
  • Kayla Whitehead - How do you start a Scholarly Communications program? 
  • Mandi Smith - Why Pay Twice? Using Overlap Tools and Reports
  • Donna Bennett - Taking Periodicals from Print to E 
  • Beverly Charlot - Synergy: Utilizing Service Design Thinking to Provide Discoverability and Access to Electronic Materials  
  • Willa Tavernier - Using outreach to build bridges between scholarly communications services and diverse constituencies 


Speakers
avatar for Cris Ferguson

Cris Ferguson

Assistant Dean of Libraries / Associate Professor, Murray State University
avatar for Kayla Whitehead

Kayla Whitehead

E-Resource Specialist, Brandeis University
avatar for Mandi Smith

Mandi Smith

Serials Librarian, University of Arkansas Libraries
Mandi Smith is the Serials Librarian at the University of Arkansas. Her research interests include electronic resources, assessment/evaluation, workflows, and improved efficiencies in academic libraries--especially in technical services.
avatar for Donna Bennett

Donna Bennett

Associate Director, Collection & Resource Services, Georgia College and State University
BC

Beverly Charlot

Coordinator of Technical Services, Delaware State University
Assessment, improving library services, technical services staff workflow procedures, staff development and library technology.
avatar for Willa Tavernier

Willa Tavernier

Open Scholarship Resident Visiting Asst Librarian, Indiana University
Hi! In my work as the Open Scholarship Diversity Resident Librarian I work to advance all forms of open scholarship with a particular focus on outreach and impact. I am active in the BIPOC in LIS community and my current areas of research are knowledge commons & governance in scholarly... Read More →



Thursday June 6, 2019 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
17th Floor Hallway

5:15pm EDT

Student Spotlight Session
Title: When Trainees Become Trainers: Empowering Student Interns and Library Staff through Student-Led Technical Skills Workshops
Presenter: Angel Su, University of Toronto

Professional development opportunities are in constant demand at the University of Toronto Libraries as staff seek to advance their skills and develop confidence in using new technologies. In response, a group of Electronic Resources and Metadata student interns prepared and delivered a series of workshops teaching data analysis, manipulation and visualization skills using Microsoft Excel. These workshops proved to be mutually beneficial for both students and staff as students had the opportunity to synthesize their knowledge through teaching, and senior staff were able to learn new skills in a comfortable environment under the enthusiastic instruction of junior staff.

Title: Development of a catalog of historical Mexican scientific journals
Presenter: Janet Falcon Hernandez, Escuela Nacional de Biblioteconomia y Archivonomia

Beginning with scientific journals which are registered titles in “Historical Atlas of Mexican Science (HAMS),” I put forward the following proposal: To develop a scientific journal catalog that includes works referring to science in Mexico, published in national or foreign journals, from the 18th century to the 20th century. The final product will be a reference source for researchers worldwide, that includes the 2,258 journals in HAMS. Also proposed is the enrichment of all bibliographic records with metadata.

**The below student proposal accepted but student was unable to attend the conference.

Title: CCPS Update
Presenter: Fatima Alejandra Morado Castillo , Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Facultad de Ciencias de la Información

Current budgetary allocation policies limit the acquisition of databases and serials, making it impossible to have all the information resources required, which creates the need to share resources. The purpose of this topic is to share the proposal of the CCPS update (part of the UASLP library system), with the aim of providing access to collections of serial publications that allow the optimal exchange of information and the dissemination of the collections available through it. In this way, it is possible to build a bridge that allows creating a current update of the 2013 version to fulfill its main objective, but that already works correctly


Speakers
AS

Angel Su

University of Toronto
JF

Janet Falcon Hernandez

Escuela Nacional de Biblioteconomia y Archivonomia
FA

Fatima Alejandra Morado Castillo

Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Facultad de Ciencias de la Información


Thursday June 6, 2019 5:15pm - 6:00pm EDT
Grand Ballroom - 17th Floor

6:30pm EDT

Dine arounds / Dinner on your own
Thursday June 6, 2019 6:30pm - 10:00pm EDT

9:00pm EDT

Late Night Social
Thursday June 6, 2019 9:00pm - 11:30pm EDT
Franklin & Greene - 17th Floor
 
Friday, June 7
 

6:00am EDT

Fun Run
Join us for a fun run around Pittsburgh’s city center! Walk, Jog, Run; all ages and abilities welcome. Meet across the street from the hotel in Mellon Park and please ensure to fill out a waiver.

** ROUTE CHANGE **
The Rachel Carson (9th St) bridge is under construction. The route will now take the Andy Warhol (7th St) Bridge 

*Please note there is one staircase along the planned route




Friday June 7, 2019 6:00am - 7:00am EDT

7:00am EDT

Breakfast Buffet
Friday June 7, 2019 7:00am - 8:45am EDT
Urban - 17th Floor

7:00am EDT

7:30am EDT

Committee Breakfast
Friday June 7, 2019 7:30am - 8:45am EDT
Sky room- 17th floor

9:00am EDT

Vision Session II / Town Hall - What should Diversity and Inclusion in NASIG look like?
This will be an interactive Town Hall where we will discuss as a group what diversity and inclusion means for NASIG.  How we can become a more inclusive organization and encourage members of underrepresented groups to get involved with NASIG?  How can the Equity and Diversity Committee help in this mission going forward.

Friday June 7, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
Grand Ballroom - 17th Floor

10:15am EDT

Break
Friday June 7, 2019 10:15am - 10:45am EDT

10:45am EDT

Bridging the Gap: Sustaining Publication of a Newly Created Undergraduate Research Journal
Once the excitement of creating a new journal has waned and publication has begun, a new challenge arises in sustainability. Augusta University first published their undergraduate research journal, Arsenal, through their institutional repository managed by the University Libraries in 2016. The Arsenal (ISSN 2380-5064 online) is a peer-reviewed, open-access interdisciplinary publication that is dedicated to publishing manuscripts resulting from Augusta University undergraduate research. Each paper published in the Arsenal undergoes a peer review process facilitated by the journal‘s Student Editorial Review Board and must be approved by an appointed faculty reviewer in the paper’s respective discipline. It is a student-run journal sponsored by the Center for Undergraduate Research & Scholarship (CURS) and published and managed by the University Libraries. The Arsenal serves as a great impetus for developing careers of nascent researchers.

Since the journal’s first publication in 2016, however, several unanticipated factors arose that have influenced continued publication. Some of these factors include changes on the student editorial board, faculty turnover, research agendas for mentoring faculty, and IRB requirements. Librarians from Augusta University will discuss some of the challenges that arose since initial publication and how the library adapted to these challenges. They will also discuss ways the library is bridging gaps to ensure continued publication of the journal, such as increasing marketing and promotion of the Arsenal to faculty and students, as well as developing further relationships with student organizations to ensure the Arsenal’s student-centered focus.

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Johnson

Melissa Johnson

Assistant Director of Reference and Education Services, Augusta University
JD

Jennifer Davis, MLIS, MA

Scholarship and Data Librarian, Augusta University
SB

Sandra Bandy, MS, AHIP

Assistant Director for Content Management, Augusta University


Friday June 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:45am EDT
Allegheny - 17th Floor

10:45am EDT

Challenges of Collection Management: Analysis, Staffing, & Space
Academic libraries with collections of all sizes face limitations of space, staffing, budget, etc., but still must maintain their collections responsibly. Collection maintenance with the goal of reclaiming space requires both solid data analysis and staff to execute projects. Presenters with perspectives from three different institutions will discuss their experiences in facing the challenges of analyzing data and managing workflows for current and potential removal projects.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Hanson

Michael Hanson

Head of Library Technical Services, Sam Houston State University
AL

Ali Larsen

Serials Librarian, Siena College
avatar for Melanie J. Church, MA, MLIS

Melanie J. Church, MA, MLIS

Content Services Librarian, Rockhurst University



Friday June 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:45am EDT
Monongahela - 17th Floor

10:45am EDT

NASIG Core Competencies: Building a Bridge to the LIS Curricula and Job Responsibilities
The 2016 revised NASIG Core Competencies for Electronic Resources Librarians broadly defines the areas of work that Electronic Resources Librarians engage with and are responsible for. Using findings from two recent studies, this presentation will identify trends in electronic resource management on two fronts. The first study investigates the degree to which Library and Information Science programs are addressing electronic resources, either as the primary subject of a course or as part of a course related to technical services. The second study addresses the distribution of electronic resources management responsibilities at Carnegie-classified R2 and R3 Doctoral Universities, small- to mid-sized academic research institutions that do not typically have a dedicated Electronic Resources Librarian.

Speakers
avatar for Cris Ferguson

Cris Ferguson

Assistant Dean of Libraries / Associate Professor, Murray State University
avatar for Caitlin Harrington

Caitlin Harrington

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Memphis


Friday June 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:45am EDT
Lawrence Welk Room - Mezzanine

10:45am EDT

The Authentication Landscape
In the RA21 era, there is no need to sacrifice features for convenience. This session will dig into the tech behind authentication methods for digital resources. Grasp the history, current state and other initiatives that are occurring in this space. Jeff Arsenault, authentication expert at EBSCO Information Services, will share insights from working with library administrators from around the globe. Shoko Tokoro, Electronic & Continuing Resources Librarian of the UNC Charlotte & Angela Dresselhaus, Head of Electronic Resources of ECU will explain why their institutions selected OpenAthens for their access solution.

Speakers
avatar for Angela Dresselhaus

Angela Dresselhaus

Head of Electronic Resources, Eastern Carolina University
ST

Shoko Tokoro

Electronic and Continuing Resources Librarian, UNC Charlotte
JA

Jeff Arsenault

Account Executive/Authentication Expert, EBSCO Information Services



Friday June 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:45am EDT
Three Rivers - WP Floor

10:45am EDT

Usability Beyond the Home Page: Bringing Usability into the Technical Services Workflow
Usability and user experience research methodology, usually defined as a group of techniques that seek to “gain a deep understanding of users, what they need, what they value and their limitations” (usability.gov) has been applied in libraries regularly to websites and public services. Common techniques include more traditional information gathering practices, like focus groups and one-one-one interview sessions to examine patron experiences, as well as observation of patrons attempting to perform tasks using a specific tool or service. Yet, outside of some usability studies comparing commercial discovery systems, little information exists in the literature about acquisitions, collections, or electronic resource management librarians using such techniques for their own work. In this presentation, I will use my work at the University of North Carolina Greensboro’s library as a case study to demonstrate how to implement these techniques to solve common problems for technical services, such as improving access and discoverability of library resources.
At UNCG, user experience studies have been scattered across departments. In order to both have a seat at the table and remove duplication of effort, I cultivated a partnership with our web services librarian and our distance education librarian, both who had been involved with user experience projects in the past. Together, we set up the first user experience team at UNCG, which focused equally on public and technical service issues. I will discuss techniques that I used to build these relationships and share our strategies for selecting initial projects that create the greatest library buy-in. Attendees should leave this session ready to look for their own User Experience partners in their library.

The second part of this presentation will discuss two case studies that demonstrate specific common user experience techniques and how they can be implemented to improve resource discovery and collection development. Attendees will learn about conducting simple five minute usability tests and longer focus group interviews. Our User Experience team has used the first technique, in which patrons performed a small series of pre-written tasks on a particular site and then answered questions about this experience, to redesign our Database A-Z page and our libguides Tests were low prep, conducted over a lunch hour in the main foyer of our library and drew an excellent patron sample. For the second technique, we conducted three focus groups with faculty who, according to emails or syllabi, have used our streaming media collections in their classroom. Our goals here were to learn more about what they value about streaming media, where they struggle in locating and using it, and to identify potential gaps in our marketing of collections. This presentation will discuss results in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the techniques, but the main focus will be to teach these two techniques and give participants the ability to go back to their library and begin to find answers to their own pressing patron-based questions.

Speakers
avatar for Kate Hill

Kate Hill

Library Services Engineer, EBSCO



Friday June 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:45am EDT
Grand Ballroom - 17th Floor

11:45am EDT

Lunch on your own
Friday June 7, 2019 11:45am - 2:00pm EDT

2:00pm EDT

Snapshot Session
1.  Evolving Roles of Acquisitions (Moon Kim )
2. Celebrating Faculty Accomplishments: Tools and Workflows Used to Gather Citations for Faculty Publications, Presentations, and Performances at the University of Richmond Libraries (Anna Creech)
3. Building Librarian and Faculty Collaboration: Using LibGuides to Facilitate Outreach and Library Research (Jean Charlot)
4. What Your Stats Say About You: Student Centered Statistics (Heather Crozier and Jenny Donley )
5. Do You Speak Spreadsheet? Using Excel to Make Managing E-serials Easier (Mandi Smith)
6. Crisis or Opportunity? Rallying Through Constant Change (Kay Johnson)

Speakers
avatar for Moon Kim

Moon Kim

Acquisitions Librarian, Ohio State University
avatar for Anna Creech

Anna Creech

Head of Resource Acquisition and Delivery, University of Richmond
Anna Creech is the Head of Resource Acquisition and Delivery at the University of Richmond, which is a fancy way of saying she’s in charge of the department that buys all the (library) things. With a background as a serials and electronic resources librarian, she has a strong interest... Read More →
JM

Jean M. Charlot

Systems & Resource Sharing Librarian, Delaware State University
HC

Heather Crozier

Electronic Resources Librarian, Ohio Northern University
JD

Jenny Donley

Catalog and Knowledge Architect Librarian, Ohio Northern University
avatar for Mandi Smith

Mandi Smith

Serials Librarian, University of Arkansas Libraries
Mandi Smith is the Serials Librarian at the University of Arkansas. Her research interests include electronic resources, assessment/evaluation, workflows, and improved efficiencies in academic libraries--especially in technical services.
avatar for Kay Johnson

Kay Johnson

Radford University
Kay Johnson is head of collection and technical services at McConnell Library, Radford University.  She has been active in NASIG for over 20 years.



Friday June 7, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT
Grand Ballroom - 17th Floor

3:00pm EDT

Break
Friday June 7, 2019 3:00pm - 3:15pm EDT

3:15pm EDT

Collaborative Approaches to Integrate Repositories within the Research Information Ecosystem: Creating Bridges for Common Goals
Open access (OA) now has many tendrils running across the wider research information landscape. There are more researchers, organizations, and systems than ever before that are engaging with (or being asked to engage with) open access throughout the research ecosystem. However too often open access activities and processes from repositories remain siloed from other research information management systems (RIMS) and tasks, creating an undue burden of time, duplication of effort, thereby undermining the overall the effectiveness of OA.

By investing in interoperability, metadata standards and practices, and creating a networked landscape of systems and community, we can create ecosystems that encourage researchers to make even more of their research open while streamlining research information management activities. By uniting the community around a more sustainable, systems-agnostic approach focused on flexible interoperability, it is possible to create an environment in which organizations can choose the tools relevant to their needs, and bring them together to complement each other, and maximize data reuse.

This presentation and discussion will explore pathways for creating a more interoperable, networked research information ecosystem, including strategies to bring together communities, content, systems and processes. Drawing examples from the usage of figshare for institutions (Repository system) and Symplectic Elements (Research Information Management System) at Carnegie Mellon University , this presentation will specifically explore where repositories sit within the research information management landscape and how they can be bridged to RIMS, outline opportunities for interconnectivity within multiple connective points, and highlight the successes of vendors and institutions working collaboratively towards common goals and achievements.

Speakers
avatar for David Scherer (he/him)

David Scherer (he/him)

Scholarly Communications and Research Curation Consultant, Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for Mark Hahnel

Mark Hahnel

Head, Figshare
#openscience #opendataBefore founding figshare I completed my PhD in stem cell biology at Imperial College London and previously studied genetics in both Newcastle and Leeds. I am passionate about open data and the potential it has to revolutionise the research community.
avatar for Ms Kate Byrne

Ms Kate Byrne

VP, Product Management, Symplectic
I lead product development and product-related community engagement at Symplectic, creating scholarly information solutions for over 100 leading institutions and research organisations around the world. My background is in libraries, research information management and open access... Read More →


Friday June 7, 2019 3:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
Monongahela - 17th Floor

3:15pm EDT

Connections of Evidence: Using Best Practices of Assessment in an Ongoing Serials Analysis Project
Making decisions about continuing or cancelling serials subscriptions is a difficult process under the best of circumstances. The worst of circumstances are those under which most academic libraries operate today: shrinking acquisitions budgets; continuously rising subscription costs; balancing a need for access and an equally pressing need for preservation of information in a variety of formats. In these situations, academic librarians can borrow from best practices of assessment in terms of gathering data, examining emergent patterns, comparing quantitative research and qualitative feedback, closing the loop by making changes, and then preparing to re-evaluate these changes. In this presentation, a case study from an academic library at a state university in the Midwest will be showcased as a model of assessment’s best practices in determining the future of print and online periodical subscriptions. In Summer 2016, The Emporia (KS) State University Libraries and Archives, or ULA, embarked upon a wholescale study of its individual periodical subscriptions via EBSCO. The last time that ULA had performed such an analysis was in the spring of 2007. In the intervening nine years, much had changed with improved full-text journal articles through online databases, Google Scholar, open access journals, and institutional repositories. ESU faculty and student needs had also evolved in terms of distance education undergraduate and graduate programs and an increasingly non-traditional student population dependent upon immediate, 24/7 access to information. Our study began in 2016 with a close examination first of our EBSCO electronic periodical subscriptions. Usage statistics of each EBSCO online periodical’s full-text retrievals were gathered from EBSCOHost EJS (Electronic Journals Service). These were combined with Project COUNTER-compliant usage statistics of JR1, Number of Full-Text Article Requests by Month and Journal, which were generated directly from the publishers’ websites of journals identified as also having direct access through our library’s journals linking pages. Cost per full-text article retrieval was then generated for these online periodicals, and any concurrent full-text access of each periodical through one or more electronic research databases was documented along with any publishers’ embargos. For the print EBSCO periodical subscriptions, we also examined any overlap with full-text access to these serials in databases. Finally, we identified the online periodical subscriptions whose access was through a single-user login and password, flagging those titles as anomalies in usage statistics because of the limitations. All this information was placed into a Google spreadsheet to be shared among the ULA librarians for their feedback. Based upon the quantitative numbers of usage statistics and cost per full-text retrieval and combined with the librarians’ qualitative knowledge of academic departments’ research and curriculum needs, a number of EBSCO periodical subscriptions were cancelled in Fall 2016 with minimum impact upon patrons’ immediate access to articles. This initial assessment in terms of “closing the loop” continued in 2017 and 2018, expanded to include subscriptions to electronic journals packages from ScienceDirect, the American Chemical Society, and Emerald Insight. The result of this assessment is an updated, refocused serials collection that truly reflects essential support of learning and research outcomes.

Speakers
avatar for Cynthia Kane

Cynthia Kane

Professor / Instruction and Assessment Librarian, Emporia State University Libraries and Archives, Emporia, KS



Friday June 7, 2019 3:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom - 17th Floor

3:15pm EDT

Publisher Platforms and NISO's PIE-J
 
Certain platform designs can inadvertently negatively affect the access of e-journals. NISO's PIE-J (Presentation and Identification of E-Journals) offers guidelines on how best to avoid this. In this session, two publishers discuss how they used PIE-J in their platform design to ensure access and discoverability of e-journal content over time.   

Speakers
avatar for Sarah (Sally) Glasser

Sarah (Sally) Glasser

Serials/E-Resources Librarian, Hofstra University
Sally Glasser is Serials/E-Resources Librarian at Hofstra University (Hempstead, NY) and Chair of NISO\\'s PIE-J Standing Committee.
avatar for Heather Otrando

Heather Otrando

Academic Product Support Manager, Cambridge University Press
I work with various people/teams involved in the ongoing support, maintenance, and development of academic products/platforms at Cambridge University Press. I'm interested in learning about library experiences with things like discovery systems/discovery of content. I like lattes... Read More →
avatar for Julie Zhu

Julie Zhu

Senior Manager, Discovery Partners, IEEE
Julie Zhu cultivates and manages effective working relationships with Discovery Service, Link Resolver, Proxy Service and Search Engine providers to maximize IEEE content findability, visibility and accessibility in multiple discovery channels. She serves in NISO’s Information Discovery... Read More →



Friday June 7, 2019 3:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
Allegheny - 17th Floor

3:15pm EDT

Pushing on the paywalls: Extending licensed resource access to external partners to enhance collaborative research
In our era of paywalls, access comes down to who is and is not considered an “authorized user.” Yet, when collaborative relationships among researchers extend beyond the definition of “authorized users,” the paywalled model of access becomes a barrier to seamless and efficient collaboration, potentially hindering progress in research. While an Open Access future can change this model, researchers need these barriers to access to be removed now.

This presentation examines the strategic partnership between the University of Colorado Boulder (CU Boulder) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) to further enhance the existing high level of collaboration between researchers at both organization in atmospheric research and climate studies. As part of this partnership the CU Boulder Libraries leveraged existing language in license agreements to extend access to over 6,000 e-resources, increasing NCAR researchers access to information by over 3000%. (Yes, that’s correct: 3000 percent). Initially, key stakeholders in the Libraries were skeptical of the feasibility of executing the parameters of the partnership, due to known barriers within license agreements that restricted access to “authorized users.” But the end result demonstrated that in coordination with campus stakeholders and external partners, libraries can leverage existing language in license agreements and relationships with publishers to significantly improve and support collaborative research activities.

The presentation serves to challenge our understanding of “authorized user” and who may be a part of our research community. It looks closely at user groups that include visiting scholars, researchers, and affiliated users. It will also serve as an opportunity for conversation, for participants to share their own experiences working with and supporting the research and access needs of user groups and organizations beyond the traditional student, faculty, staff model. Finally, this session will serve to empower us to continue to push against the paywall and seek new ways to support our greater research community.

Speakers
avatar for Juleah Swanson

Juleah Swanson

Head of Acquisition Services, University of Colorado Boulder



Friday June 7, 2019 3:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
Three Rivers - WP Floor

3:15pm EDT

Trial by fire and then some for electronic resources: connecting the community through customer service
Electronic resource troubleshooting can feel like putting out a fire every day in a library. When a real fire comes along as Kansas State University experienced this past summer, one learns not to take electronic resources and the fact that they are working for granted. Regardless of integrated library system or discovery layer, getting databases and online subscriptions back up is especially critical for a collection without a building. Getting back to a sense of “normal” involves rethinking priorities, staffing, and the nature of the resources in given circumstances. The Jane Hale electronic resource ticketing system was staffed with more intention resulting in more timely access to the electronic resources. Relocation of ticketing staff to a different building off-campus created more empathy for the users.

The May 2018 fire coincided with the end of the fiscal year, cancellations, and renewals. Damage to the University Data Center housed in Hale Library meant the proxy server had to be rebuilt from an old configuration file with a dated user file for temporary authentication. Jane Hale ticketing staffing and processes were not in an optimal place. Earlier in the fall of 2017 the acquisitions unit began a study of its Jane Hale ticketing system for electronic resource issues and problems. Combining the fire event with the Jane Hale ticketing system as a framework yielded growth in customer service orientation. The community of vendors, librarians, and patrons demonstrated an outpouring of support and kindness.

Lessons learned include creating good relationships before something goes bad and fostering a sense of community. Communication both internal and external is very important. The disaster response for electronic resources became an effective continuity plan: deciding what is essential and how to use communication and other skills to meet the needs of the library community.

Speakers
avatar for Mary E. Bailey

Mary E. Bailey

Continuing Resources Librarian, Kansas State University
avatar for Christina Geuther

Christina Geuther

Electronic Resources Librarian, Kansas State University
I manage electronic resource license records in Alma, negotiate license terms with vendors, and troubleshoot electronic resource access for K-State Libraries.
MT

Michelle Turvey-Welch

Associate Professor, KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY - HALE LIBRARY



Friday June 7, 2019 3:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
Lawrence Welk Room - Mezzanine

4:30pm EDT

Members Forum
Agenda:
 
Highlights from the past year
Financial report
Introduction to the 2019-2020 Board
Recognition of outgoing Board members and committee chairs
Open Access Conference Proceedings Discussion
Vote on Membership Dues Increase
Discussion of old business
Call for new business

Friday June 7, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm EDT
Grand Ballroom - 17th Floor

6:00pm EDT

Dinner on your own
Friday June 7, 2019 6:00pm - 10:00pm EDT

9:00pm EDT

Late Night Social
Friday June 7, 2019 9:00pm - 11:30pm EDT
Franklin & Greene - 17th Floor
 
Saturday, June 8
 

7:00am EDT

Breakfast Buffet
Saturday June 8, 2019 7:00am - 8:45am EDT
Urban - 17th Floor

9:00am EDT

An Accessibility Survey of Libraries: Results, Best Practices, and Next Steps
Institutional, state, and federal requirements addressing the accessibility of digital content continue to evolve, thus creating a complex accessibility landscape for libraries as they purchase and create both content and systems. Institutions are faced with a multitude of variables, including adherence to Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the World Wide Web Consortium’s Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), and more. As libraries grapple with this new landscape, they want to know where they stand amongst their peers, what mandates apply to their situations, and how library staff are training for accessibility requirements, among other issues.

The May 2018 Association of Research Libraries (ARL) SPEC Kit 358, Accessibility and Universal Design, provided an excellent introductory environmental scan of how the largest research libraries in North America are meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. LYRASIS, a membership organization of more than 1,000 galleries, libraries, archives, and museums of all types and sizes, wanted to expand on this research to gain feedback from the remaining majority of academic libraries serving smaller and mid-sized institutions. LYRASIS is in a unique position to offer a picture of the challenges libraries confront regarding accessibility. The organization’s broad membership base, a deep history of group licensing of digital content, and increasing support for Open Access initiatives all place LYRASIS at the front lines of accessibility concerns.

In the beginning of 2019, LYRASIS will distribute a survey instrument to its members in order to collate these challenges, determine best practices, and outline next steps for libraries struggling to make sense of the accessibility landscape. This presentation will deliver the results of that survey as well as contextualize these results within an overview of recent accessibility reports and initiatives.

Speakers
avatar for Beth Ashmore

Beth Ashmore

Associate Head, Acquisitions & Discovery (Serials), North Carolina State University
avatar for Jill Grogg

Jill Grogg

Strategist, Content and Schol Comm Initiatives, LYRASIS
Jill Grogg is a Strategist with the Content & Scholarly Communication Initiatives team at LYRASIS. Previously, she was electronic resources coorindator at The University of Alabama Libraries for over a decade.
avatar for Hannah Rosen

Hannah Rosen

Strategist, Research and Schol Comm Initiatives, LYRASIS
Hannah Rosen is a Strategist for Research and Scholarly Communication at LYRASIS. Within the Content and Scholarly Communication Initiatives team she is responsible for managing vendor and not-for-profit partnerships, including, but not limited to, digitization vendors, open access... Read More →



Saturday June 8, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Conference Center A - CL Floor

9:00am EDT

Compelling Evidence: New Tools and Methods for Aligning Collections with the Research Mission
Research problem

Libraries are constantly evaluating and adjusting their activities to best align with the mission and priorities of the communities they serve. More recently, greater emphasis has been placed on using evidence-based decision making for collection development-related projects. As an administrative member of Northwestern University’s Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (CTSI), Galter Health Sciences Library & Learning Center is particularly interested in how the library’s collection meets the needs of the CTSI in translating research and discoveries from the lab to real world solutions for patients and the larger community. This unique mission has led librarians at Galter to focus on resources related to translational research, such as clinical trials, patents, and policy documents, and to try to determine how effectively the library’s collection covers these resources.

Research Methodology

Previously, librarians identified and documented a scalable and semi-automated workflow for analyzing citation information from faculty publications sourced from Web of Science, and combined this with COUNTER data for a contextual examination of Galter Library's collections and Northwestern's scholarly outputs. This new project expands on past work by utilizing Digital Science Dimensions as a data source to capture unexplored publication types. Dimensions allows librarians to identify clinical trials with Northwestern-affiliated investigators, and patents where Northwestern authors are patent holders. Publications cited by the patents or trials will be analyzed to determine whether the journals are in the library’s holdings. Librarians will also review policy documents that cite papers where there was at least one Northwestern-affiliated author, and analysis will be done of the journal title breakdown.

The decision to utilize Dimensions as a data source stems from the ability to search clinical trials, patents, grants, and policy documents using its interface. Perhaps even more importantly, Dimensions establishes links between all content types, allowing one to establish interlinked research-output timelines. This allows the identification of journals on the cited reference lists of these unique document types, and thus the investigation of the journals’ coverage in the library’s collection.

Preliminary Results

A small pilot investigation of Northwestern-affiliated clinical trials on topics related to dermatology identified 193 clinical trials, which contain a total of 859 cited references. De-duplication of the data resulted in 730 unique references with 329 unique journal titles. Librarians reviewed all journal titles with more than one reference, and found that the majority of these titles exist in the library’s collections. Moving forward with a larger study, the group plans for a more granular analysis of a wider selection of subject areas, comparing dates of holdings coverage against the dates in which the journals were cited in the patent, clinical trial, or policy document, whether these journal titles are licensed through big package deals or available as open access publications, and how the findings compare to traditional e-resource metrics such as full-text retrievals and journal cost-per-use. As in the previous study, librarians are looking to identify gaps in the library’s holdings and other citation patterns of interest.

Speakers
JP

Joelen Pastva

Head, Collection Management & Metadata Services, Galter Health Sciences Library & Learning Center, Northwestern University



Saturday June 8, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Monongahela - 17th Floor

9:00am EDT

Getting More Bang for your Buck: Working with Your Vendor in the Age of the Shrinking Staff
Library expenditures for serials are growing while staffing of serials operations is declining. Sara Bahnmaier, Resource Licensing and Management Librarian at the University of Michigan, will report on the changes in her organization and how her library relies on subscription agencies to manage its serials accounts. Bill Sherfey, Regional Manager for HARRASSOWITZ, long-term subscription vendor for the University of Michigan Libraries, will present from a vendor’s perspective the training and in-house expertise that a vendor has to offer the library in these times of lean and mean staffing. The University Libraries recently began working also with WT Cox for some of their North American subscriptions. Maria Hatfield, Vice President of Integrated Solutions at WT Cox, will address how to establish an effective new vendor-library relationship in order for the library to get the most support possible. Join the discussion about using vendor services to optimize your serials workflows.

Speakers
avatar for Sara Bahnmaier

Sara Bahnmaier

Acquisitions & Licensing Librarian, University of Michigan
MH

Maria Hatfield

VP, Integrated Solutions, WT Cox Information Services
Maria Hatfield joined WT Cox Information Services in 2005 and is currently the Vice President of Integrated Solutions. Her experience actively working with publishers, librarians, and library technology has served her well to lead the Integrated Solutions division specializing in... Read More →
WS

William Sherfey

HARRASSOWITZ Booksellers and Subscription Agents



Saturday June 8, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Grand Ballroom - 17th Floor

9:00am EDT

Managing open content resources from discovery to delivery
Presenting open access resources alongside licensed content provides many benefits to both you and your patrons. However, the tools and collection development practices designed to work with traditionally acquired materials often pose challenges for freely available resources. This session will address managing open content library collections and offer an assessment of current delivery models and opportunities for upgrading delivery in the future, including:

• How to integrate open content into collection development strategies;
• How to improve the data around open content;
• How MARC record changes will impact the way users find and access open content; and
• How library service providers are improving the open access user experience.
 
You will gain valuable, up-to-date knowledge of today’s open access landscape, and walk away with a checklist of best practices for integrating open access content into your collection development strategies; configuring metadata to maximize visibility of open access content and for partnering with publishers; and library service providers on solutions that deliver benefits to you and your users.

Speakers
avatar for Danielle Bromelia

Danielle Bromelia

Senior Product Analyst, OCLC


Saturday June 8, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Lawrence Welk Room - Mezzanine

9:00am EDT

Upcycling a Schol Comm Unit: Building Bridges with Creativity, Reallocations, and Limited Resources
The Scholarly Communication Unit of the David L. Rice Library at the University of Southern Indiana started not with a bang, but with a lateral transition. Over the next two years, the unit has focused on creatively developing the themes of scholarly communication competencies within and outside the library despite limited resources, and this session will serve to highlight ways in which other libraries that are facing similar limitations can still provide quality services to their institutions. The knowledge and skills necessary to build the scholarly communication programs have been culled from across the library with strategic reconsideration of job lines and descriptions. Utilizing affordable professional development activities has deepened our ability to support scholarly communication activities on campus. The realignment of positions with existing personnel, has also enabled us to leverage existing relationships to produce outreach activities that include our faculty advocates. Similarly, the institutional knowledge within the library and our relationships across campus have allowed us to pursue a particularly creative approach to open access funding that does not require a new line of money from the university. Our approach to scholarly communication services has fundamentally been as a public service that requires innovative problem-solving in order to identify and enhance competencies within the library so that we can successfully take programs outside the library and strategically reallocate resources to build a Scholarly Communication Unit that serves our entire campus.

Speakers
avatar for Pete Whiting

Pete Whiting

Scholarly Communication Librarian, University of Southern Indiana
AW

Andrea Wright

Assistant Director and Head of Public Services, University of Southern Indiana



Saturday June 8, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Allegheny - 17th Floor

10:15am EDT

Vision III - Bridging the Worlds of MARC and Linked Data: Transition, Transformation, Accountability
Building Bridges is an immensely important theme: bridges connect communities, connect ideas, connect generations and practices. But they need to be built with caution. Although bridges can create a safe pathway through unsettling times, they can allow us to distance ourselves from the cause of that turbulence. The realities of the Sematic Web, disruptive innovation, and social justice are shaking our world.   They cannot and should not be avoided. How can libraries, especially Technical Services, fold these emerging concepts into the core of what they are and what they do?

Join Zoom Meeting
https://encore-us.zoom.us/j/297837148


Bio
Philip Schreur is currently the Associate University Librarian for Technical and Access Services at Stanford University.  He earned a PhD from Stanford in Medieval music theory and an MLIS from the University of California, Berkeley.  Philip has been the Chair of the Program for Cooperative cataloging and deeply involved in the implementation of the new cataloging rules Resource, Description and Access (RDA) in the United States. With a mid-career move to HighWire Press, he developed an interest in the automated taxonomic analysis of digital texts.  Currently, he is in charge of coordinating linked-data project development for the Stanford University Libraries (SUL).  Initial areas of interest include the use of linked data as a mechanism for identity management across traditional resources and those within the digital library, the integration of linked data from disparate sources, and the transition of traditional technical services workflows to processes rooted in linked open data.

Speakers

Saturday June 8, 2019 10:15am - 11:30am EDT
Grand Ballroom - 17th Floor

11:30am EDT

Closing Session
Saturday June 8, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Grand Ballroom - 17th Floor

12:30pm EDT

Board Meeting
Saturday June 8, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm EDT
Allegheny - 17th Floor